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What is a Coverdell ESA?

A Coverdell ESA is an account which can be used to save for educational expenses. These used to be called Educational IRAs until someone realized that didn’t make sense. A Coverdell Educational Savings Account (ESA) allows you to save money for your child’s future education costs. As opposed to a 529 Plan, which is limited to post-high school education, money from an ESA can be used as early as Kindergarten. Continue reading...

What are the Contribution Limits For My Coverdell ESA?

Coverdell ESAs have low contribution limits, and an income limit that may keep you from contributing at all. Currently, in order to contribute to an ESA at all, you and your spouse must make less than $220,000 per year (combined). The annual contribution limit to an ESA is $2,000, and the contributions made to an ESA are not tax-deductible. These limits have not been adjusted for inflation in years, and these plans are quickly becoming obsolete. Continue reading...

How Can I Use the Money From My Coverdell ESA?

Coverdell ESA accounts can be used to cover educational expenses. Similarly to a 529 Plan, the money from a Coverdell ESA can only be used for qualified educational expenses. However, the definitions for “qualified” are broader with this plan, and can be used for educational expenses from Kindergarten through high school, in addition to postsecondary (college) expenses. The downside is that Coverdell’s have a low contribution limit of only $2,000 per year. Continue reading...

How Can the Money in My Coverdell ESA be Invested?

You have about as many investment choices in a Coverdell as you would in a personal IRA account. Money in a Coverdell ESA can be invested in financial instruments such as mutual funds. You can establish a Coverdell ESA at any major brokerage or bank, and the investment choices will vary depending on the institution. The account will grow tax-deferred, and the withdrawals are not taxed as long as they are used for appropriate educational expenses. Continue reading...

How Can I Use the Money From My 529 Plan?

You can technically use it however you see fit if you are willing to pay the 10% IRS penalty. Money from 529 Plans can be used for tuition, books, supplies, room and board and, as of recently, computers and electronic necessities. Always check if you’re not sure that an expense is covered by the 529 plan. Money used for anything other than the specified costs will be subject to federal income taxes and a 10% penalty on the earnings. You can also transfer the account to another beneficiary or yourself if you or someone else will need the money for college one day, without incurring any penalties or taxes. Continue reading...

What is a 529 Plan?

529 plans are accounts designed to help families save for the future college expenses of young family members. A 529 Plan is designed to help you save money now to pay your child’s college expenses later. Investment companies who design a plan, which looks similar to a retail mutual fund account or IRA, will partner with state governments to offer the state’s official 529 plan. Families can invest in a 529 and gain access to an array of mutual funds. Continue reading...

What is Form 1099-Q?

IRS Link to Form — Found Here Distributions from qualified educational accounts such as 529s will be reported on a 1099-Q. This will be submitted by the institution serving as the custodian of the account. Qualified tuition programs (QTPs) might include Coverdell Educational Savings Accounts (ESAs) or 529 plans, and distributions from these plans are not taxable when used for qualified educational expenses, such as college tuition. Continue reading...

Who Can Participate in an HSA?

Who Can Participate in an HSA?

In order to be eligible for an HSA, you must be enrolled in a high deductible health plan (HDHP) that is HSA-eligible. You must also not be enrolled in Medicare and you cannot be claimed as a dependent on someone else’s health plan. Your health insurance must also be part of a high deductible plan with substantial out-of-pocket costs. How Does a Health Savings Account Work? Where Should I Put my Healthcare Savings? What is Medicare and Medicaid? Continue reading...

What’s a 403(b) Plan?

403(b) are basically just 401(k)s for non-profit organizations. A 403(b) Plan is essentially a 401(k) for publicly-funded institutions such as public schools and universities, certain hospitals, and non-profit organizations. They are sometimes called TSAs, short for Tax-Sheltered Annuity, but this is outdated, and a misnomer since they do not need to use annuity products. The contributions are deducted from the paychecks in the same manner they would be for a 401(k), and the assets grow tax-deferred within the account. A Roth 403(b) is uncommon but sometimes offered. Continue reading...

What is IRS Form 1099-SA used for?

What is IRS Form 1099-SA used for?

Navigating the maze of tax documentation can be daunting. Enter Form 1099-SA, a pivotal IRS document detailing distributions from health accounts. But what is its purpose? Who needs to file it? And how does it affect your tax landscape? This comprehensive guide demystifies Form 1099-SA, offering insights into its components, tax implications, and the nuances of different health accounts. Whether you're an individual taxpayer or a financial institution, understanding Form 1099-SA is crucial to ensuring compliance and maximizing the benefits of health accounts. Dive in to unlock the world of health account distributions and their tax intricacies. Continue reading...

How Does a Health Savings Account Work?

How Does a Health Savings Account Work?

A Health Savings Account (HSA) allows the owner to save (and invest) money in an account, which can be used to pay for health expenses on a tax advantaged basis. Generally speaking, your contributions to a HSA are tax deductible, the earnings grow on a tax deferred basis, and you can withdraw the money tax free if used for a qualified health expense. As 2016, you are allowed to contribute $3,350 (for individuals) and $6,750 (for families) to the account, plus an additional $1,000 if you’re over 55. Continue reading...

What is Exponential Moving Average?

What is Exponential Moving Average?

Moving averages are important components of many technical indicators. The Exponential Moving Average (EMA) uses the closing prices of all the previous trading days for a given interval to calculate an average price from that for the period, but is weighted to give the most recent days more influence over the final number. The weighted averages are plotted in a line that helps traders follow trends. Continue reading...

Where Should I Put my Healthcare Savings?

Where Should I Put my Healthcare Savings?

There are two options for saving for healthcare needs: brokerage accounts and Health Savings Accounts (HSAs). Brokerage accounts provide more investment flexibility and no restrictions on withdrawals, but may be subject to taxes and penalties. HSAs provide a triple tax benefit, higher contribution limits, and no expiration date, but have restrictions on how funds can be used. The article emphasizes the importance of starting to save for healthcare expenses early and staying informed about healthcare options. Ultimately, the choice between these options depends on an individual's circumstances and goals. Continue reading...

What are Simple and Exponential Moving Averages?

What are Simple and Exponential Moving Averages?

Moving averages are important components of many technical indicators. A simple moving average determines the average of a range of closing prices for a security or index for a specific period of time. An exponential moving average is a moving average that gives more weight to the most recent data. Simple moving averages are not weighted for time the way that exponential moving averages are, which has the effect of snapping the chart to the most current information, while simple moving averages have lag. Continue reading...

How is a 403(b) Different From a 401(k)?

403(b)s are essentially the same as 401(k)s but there are a few notable differences. A 403(b) is extremely similar to a 401(k); the main difference is the type of employer than can offer each. 403(b)s are offered by public educational institutions, non-profit hospitals, non-profit organizations, religious groups and some government organizations. Due to the negotiating powers of many of those institutions, and their non-profit status, the administrative fees are smaller and they are not subject to some of the administrative oversight imposed on 401(k)s. Most 403(b)s are not subject to ERISA, which means they don’t have to satisfy as many auditing and reporting requirements. Continue reading...

How to use the MACD in trading?

How to use the MACD in trading?

Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD) is a frequently used momentum indicator composed of several moving average lines. A MACD line is plotted by using the exponential moving average (EMA) over 12-day periods and subtracting the EMA of 26-day periods. A “signal line” – the 9-day EMA – is then plotted on top of the MACD line. A histogram is also usually included to indicate the divergence between the signal line and the MACD. When the MACD and the signal line cross paths, these points of convergence are widely used as trading indicators that trends are starting or ending. Continue reading...

What is Weighted Average?

What is Weighted Average?

A weighted average is a calculation considers the relative importance or relevance of a piece of data. Weighted averages multiply numbers in the average by a predetermined factor, like time, that enhances the relevance given to the number. One example of a weighted average is the Exponential Moving Average (EMA), an alternative to the Simple Moving Average (SMA) line which gives greater weight to the more recent data. SMAs are effective in their simplicity, but their efficacy is most closely tied to how they are used. Continue reading...

What is the Advance/Decline Divergence Oscillator?

What is the Advance/Decline Divergence Oscillator?

The advance/decline divergence oscillator (also called the McClellan Oscillator after its creators) tracks the rate of change in the advance-decline line (net advances). The AD line is formed from the Net Advances/Declines calculated daily at market close; this represents the proportion of stocks which advanced (increased) in price that day versus those which declined – the size of the difference is called the daily breadth. The advance/decline divergence oscillator can be applied to any group of stocks or exchange. Continue reading...

What is Endpoint Moving Average (EPMA)?

What is Endpoint Moving Average (EPMA)?

Moving averages are important components of many technical indicators. The Endpoint Moving Average (EPMA) is a popular method of plotting a line that uses linear regression instead of averages, which reduces the noise of market price activity and can reveal or follow trends. Compared to a simple moving average, this method hews more closely to data and lags less. A moving average line averages prices in a given time period (such as the 30 days leading up to each day), and plots that point on a chart; when connected, the collection of points becomes the moving average line. Continue reading...

What is swing trading?

What is swing trading?

Swing trading is active trading that is not frequent enough to be categorized as day-trading but generally follows short-term trends. Swing trading can describe long or short positions traded on upswings and downswings of a security or index, and these positions are generally held from one day to two weeks. Generally, these are going to be momentum investments which are entered into after there seems to be confirmation of a trend, and the positions are closed out when there seems to be confirmation that the trend has ended. Continue reading...