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What is a market-maker spread?

The difference between the Bid and Ask prices on a stock or other security are known as the Spread. Designated market makers are traders whose job it is to make a market for securities, by offering to buy or sell shares, and thus creating liquidity, often at the same time. Their money is made on the spread. In highly liquid markets, the spread will shrink. So if everyone is buying and selling the same stock one day, there may be virtually no spread between the Bid and the Ask price, and this is seen as efficient. Continue reading...

What is a Basis Point?

When percentages being used to describe a security are very small, basis points are often used to describe the numbers. A Basis Point (bp) is 1/100th of a percent, so 1% = 100 bps. This metric is used when discussing financial instruments for which very small changes in percentages can make a difference. For example, rates on single premium immediate annuities change weekly, and generally only by a few basis points. These small changes can make a difference competitively week-to-week, because a few basis points can translate to thousands of dollars of income over time. Other places where basis points are used include: advisory and management fees, moves in indexes and securities, bonds, and so on. Continue reading...

What is a pivot point?

A pivot point is a technical indicator used by traders to determine overall market trends over various windows. This indicator used to be solely the average of the high, low, and closing prices of the previous day, but modern trading utilizes different versions of this concept for day trading and short term analysis. In many cases, pivot points are now quick-reference tools used in intra-day trading that give the trader benchmarks and perspective as short-term price movements happen. How the trader calculates the pivot point depends on whether the point is going to be part of a chart with a scope of several minutes or the present day or present week. Continue reading...

What are Pivot Points?

Pivot points are quick-reference tools used in intra-day trading that give the trader benchmarks and perspective while short-term price movements happen. Pivot points are set by taking the high, low, and close price levels of a stock market index or individual security for the previous day or week and basing support and resistance levels from there by multiplying those numbers by simple factors. These multiple might be very simple, such as 2x or 3x, or using Fibonacci numbers, which is still a simple calculation if you have the Fibonacci numbers. These are meant to be very quickly generated on a piece of scratch paper, and because of their simplicity, they were a favorite among floor traders. Continue reading...

What does PIP mean?

A PIP is the standard smallest increment of change or precision at which a currency is quoted and tracked in Forex markets. One ‘PIP’ equals .0001 of the size of a lot of currency being exchanged, in terms of the counter currency. A PIP stands for Percentage in Point and is the integer which appears in the 10,000th place when quoting currency exchange rates. It is actually the same as a Basis Point, used in bond and equity markets, which is 1/100th of 1%. If we were exchanging GBP (British Pounds) for USD (US Dollars), in a Mini-lot of 10,000, one PIP would equal $1. Continue reading...

What is Volume Weighted Average Price (VWAP)?

The Volume Weighted Average Price (VWAP) helps traders consider the influence of volume on prices. VWAP is calculated by taking the average of prices from a time period and dividing it by the trading volume for the current day. Traders use VWAP to confirm trends and decide whether to take long or short positions, while large institutions are likely to use VWAP to avoid disrupting market prices, finding the liquid and illiquid price points and trading so as not to move prices away from the averages. Continue reading...

What Kinds of Overlays are Used in Chart Patterns?

Overlays are technical supplements which help to interpret the data of a normal price chart. Often a chart program will allow the user to pick a few different overlays at a time, to help him or her get a better idea of what is going on with the price. Some common overlays include moving average lines, Bollinger Bands, Ichimoku clouds, and channel lines. An overlay or series of overlays will appear as additional lines, shading, or other graphics on a price chart. An overlay helps a trader or analyst interpret the price data in the context of other data, by putting the other data right on top of it. Continue reading...

What is Mortgage Par Rate?

Lenders have a different par rate for different types of borrowers, which is the base around which they have the ability to negotiate deals. The par rate will be based on the prevailing interest rate environment, with factors changing it slightly for different potential borrowers and the risk associated with them based on creditworthiness. Par rate is the fair market value of a loan for a person with certain risk characteristics, from a lending institution of certain size and qualities. The par rate is the reference point around which a borrower and a lender will strike a deal, even though this is often unknown to the borrower. If the lender, which might be a bank loan officer or a mortgage broker, gives the borrower a break on the front-end cost of the loan, the borrower might have some interest tacked on to the par rate to make up for it. Continue reading...

How is the Consumer Price Index (CPI) Calculated?

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is calculated using prices of sample goods from predetermined urban areas. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the CPI is a product of a series of interrelated samples. First, using data from the 1990 Census of Population, BLS selected the urban areas from which data on prices were collected and chose the housing units within each area that were eligible for use in the shelter component of the CPI. The Census of Population also provided data on the number of consumers represented by each area selected as a CPI price collection area. Continue reading...

3 Key Points for Crypto Trading

Step into the future of finance with our comprehensive guide to cryptocurrency trading. Uncover the secrets of Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Binance Coin, and master trading strategies powered by AI. From technical analysis to risk management, learn how to navigate the volatile crypto market and harness the power of AI-driven tools for smarter investments. Join us on a journey through the innovative landscape of digital currencies, where technology meets opportunity. Continue reading...

How Effective Are Pivot Points for Making Predictions?

Pivot points are a valuable tool in the trader's arsenal, offering insights into potential support and resistance levels in the market. These key price levels help traders make informed decisions about entry and exit points, risk management, and overall market trends. In this article, we will explore the concept of pivot points, how to calculate them, alternative methods, and their practical application in trading. Continue reading...

4 Key Points: Day vs. Swing Trading

Unlock the secrets of Swing Trading vs. Day Trading: two pathways to market mastery. Discover which strategy aligns with your trading style, learn about the advantages of each, and how Tickeron's AI technology can enhance your market moves. Whether you're looking for quick wins or prefer riding the waves of market trends, find out how to leverage cutting-edge tools for smarter, more informed trading decisions. Continue reading...

3 Points for Successful Cryptocurrency Trading Using AI Bots

Dive into the future of cryptocurrency trading with AI-driven robots that are changing the game. Discover how cutting-edge technologies like pattern recognition and machine learning are empowering traders to outperform in the dynamic world of Bitcoin, Ethereum, and more. Uncover the secrets behind platforms like Ticeron, where sophisticated algorithms offer real-time market analysis and adaptive strategies for unparalleled trading precision. Welcome to the new era of trading, where AI meets crypto for unmatched success. Continue reading...

Day Trading Insights: Critical Focus Points from Morning to Evening

Embark on a journey through the high-stakes world of day trading with Tickeron's innovative guide. Discover how AI-driven strategies can redefine your trading approach, offering swift profits, strategic depth, and unparalleled market control. Whether you're captivated by the allure of quick gains or the precision of AI models, this article unveils the essentials of thriving in the dynamic financial market. Continue reading...

What is a Point of Sale (POS) System and How Does It Transform Modern Commerce?

Point of Sale (POS) systems have become the cornerstone of modern commerce, transforming the way businesses operate and engage with customers. These intricate systems, a blend of hardware and software, not only facilitate transactions but also offer insights into market trends, inventory management, and customer behavior. From the traditional cash register to the sophisticated digital platforms of today, POS systems have evolved to meet the dynamic needs of retailers. They play a pivotal role in both physical stores and e-commerce domains, ensuring seamless transactions and providing valuable data for strategic decision-making. With innovations like Amazon Go redefining the shopping experience, the future of POS systems promises even greater convenience and efficiency. As technology continues to advance, POS systems stand as a testament to the symbiotic relationship between innovation and commerce, shaping the way we buy and sell in the 21st century. Continue reading...

What is Chapter 10?

Chapter 10 is a bankruptcy filing available to smaller corporations where they agree to have their management replaced to oversee a restructuring, and they also agree to have their debts repaid within three years. If a company does not have more than $2.5 million in debt, they may be able to file Chapter 10 bankruptcy. The company and its attorney will put together a plan for reorganization and explain how the plan will ensure that the company meet its obligations in the future. Continue reading...

What is Diminishing Marginal Utility?

The decrease in the usefulness or demand for something as more and more of it is introduced or produced. The easiest way to conceptualize diminishing marginal utility is by thinking of a factory into which you must put workers who will produce goods. The first group of workers you hire increases the productivity immensely compared to what was being produced before they were hired. The second group of workers helps a lot also, but not quite as much as the first. Some of the workers have downtime now for a few minutes a day when no work is being done. You hire a third bunch of workers to increase production to get closer to your competitors, and it works, but now some of the workers are supervisors and the new hires don’t have the same drive and sense of ownership in the company. Continue reading...

How Does a Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Differ in Responsibilities from Other Chief Roles?

Unlock the mysteries behind the CEO's desk! Dive deep into the multifaceted world of Chief Executive Officers, contrasting their pivotal roles with other chief positions. Discover the influence they wield on company performance and where they stand in the corporate hierarchy. Continue reading...

What Is a Conservatorship?

A conservatorship is a legal status established by a court that appoints an individual to manage the financial and personal affairs of a minor or an incapacitated person. This arrangement ensures that individuals who are unable to manage their own affairs due to factors such as mental incapacity, intellectual disabilities, or age-related conditions are provided for and protected. Let's delve into the intricacies of conservatorship, how it functions, its various types, and the alternatives available. Continue reading...

Can I Decide How My Money is Invested in My Defined Benefit Plan?

Employees have no control over the assets in their Defined Benefit plan. The short and simple answer is: No. The payments you will receive in retirement are calculated according to a pre-determined formula. Your employer is responsible for managing the investments, while you simply receive the agreed-upon payments when they are due to you - assuming all goes as planned. Most pension funds, as they are sometimes called, are invested in very conservative instruments such as long term government bonds and fixed accounts offered by some insurance companies and banking institutions. Continue reading...

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