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Corporate BasicsBasicsCorporate StructureCorporate FundamentalsCorporate DebtRisksEconomicsCorporate AccountingDividendsEarnings

Who is a Bond Trustee?

A bond trustee is an institution which has the fiduciary responsibility of administering and enforcing the terms of the bond indenture. A bond indenture is the contract between the bond issuer and the bondholder. A trustee has the resources to manage the distribution of the funds to the bondholders, to keep up with and distribute the required bookkeeping and statement information to the interested parties as well as regulators like the SEC. If there is a violation of the contract, the trustee must report it and act in the best interest of the wronged party. Continue reading...

What is currency arbitrage?

Currency arbitrage is when the value of a triangle of currency pairs does not cross-correlate, and a bank or large institution is able to exploit the temporary discrepancy for a profit before the market equalizes again. Arbitrage is when an investor (usually an institutional investor) can pick up something in one market that has a higher value in another market, perhaps due to lower liquidity or information flow in the secondary market, and can move goods or securities across these markets and make a profit. Continue reading...

What is market arbitrage?

Market arbitrage is when investors, particularly institutional investors, find price discrepancies between one exchange and another and exploit the difference for their profit. It has the helpful side-effect of bringing the prices on all exchanges closer together. Arbitrageurs are investors and brokers who bridge the gap between prices in one market and another. The price difference is similar to the bid/ask spread profit created by market makers. If a stock is listed on multiple exchanges, it is said to be cross-listed, and it may present an arbitrage opportunity. Continue reading...

What does Arbitrage Mean?

Arbitrage is the practice of buying a security/product in one market and selling it in another, in an effort to capitalize on price difference. Arbitrage can take many forms in trading: buying a security in one market and selling it in another for a better price (market arbitrage); borrowing money in one currency at a lower interest rate in order to pay off debt in another currency with a higher interest rate (currency arbitrage); buying and selling the same security on different exchanges or between spot prices of a security and its future contract; and so on. Continue reading...

What is an Abandonment Option?

An Abandonment Option can be worked into a contract for a capital project at a business, for example, or between an investment advisor and his or her clients. An abandonment option outlines the terms by which either party in an agreement can choose to cease their involvement in the project or a working relationship without penalty. This may be worked into the contract on a business partnership agreement, a capital project, or even something as simple as the relationship between a financial planner and his or her clients. Continue reading...

What is Dividend Arbitrage?

Arbitrage opportunities can be found in a few different places in the market, when risk-free profit can be made. If a stock is purchased before the ex-dividend date, and a put is exercised when the share price falls after the dividend is distributed, it is known as dividend arbitrage. Arbitrage is when an investor finds a situation where one thing can be exchanged for another, such as the same thing on two different exchanges or similar fixed instruments which can be swapped, when no risk is taken and a profit is gained. Continue reading...

What is the currency carry trade?

Assets that are held are sometimes analyzed in terms of the cost of carrying them, called the cost of carry. In certain situations, there may be a potential for profit if an asset that might otherwise have a cost of carry could be traded for an asset that actually generates profit. The arbitrage opportunity that exists in that space, and the market formed by it, is sometimes called the carry trade, or the currency carry trade where it applies to currency. Continue reading...

What is Dividend Capture?

Dividend capture is a strategy similar to dividend arbitrage that seeks to reap incremental gains somewhat reliably around the ex-dividend date of a stock. The investor seeks to benefit from the fact that stock prices don’t always go down as much as they should on the ex-dividend date, so by selling quickly at that point, the investor may still get a small gain from the dividend that will still be paid to him or her. Dividend capture is a strategy that plays on slight inefficiencies in prices around the ex-dividend date. Continue reading...

What is a credit default swap?

A Credit Default Swap is a contract that provides a hedge against credit default risk. To guarantee against the non-payment of a loan, a Credit Default Swap can be purchased for a premium. The seller of the swap bears the risk of payment if a bond issuer defaults, or if there is a similarly threatening “credit event” which is agreed upon in the terms of the swap contract. Generally, the buyer of a credit default swap will pay quarterly premiums for the protection, and the annualized premium is called the "spread," which may be a set percentage of the notional amount. Continue reading...

What Is Arbitrage?

In the world of finance, one concept that has stood the test of time is arbitrage. It's a term that may sound complex, but at its core, it's a straightforward strategy employed by traders to capitalize on differences in asset prices across various markets. In this article, we'll delve into the world of arbitrage, exploring what it is, how it works, and why it's a critical component of efficient financial markets. Continue reading...

What is the Investment Advisors Act of 1940?

The IAA sought to regulate an industry that was deemed to be of public concern and within the Federal jurisdiction, though it did define some state-specific jurisdictions. It defines investment advisors and made laws dealing with fraud, advertising, non-public client information, disclosures, handling of client funds, and so forth. The Investment Advisors Act of 1940 established definitions for the capacity in which an investment adviser and investment advice could be defined, and made rules concerning the standards by which advisors should operate. Continue reading...

What is FINRA?

FINRA stands for Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, and they regulate securities firms in the United States. FINRA has no political affiliation and is charged with governing all business dealings conducted between dealers, brokers and all public investors. In other words, the rules that dictate how your financial advisor interacts with you are set forth by FINRA. In all, FINRA oversees more than 4,500 brokerage firms, approximately 160,000 branch offices and more than half a million registered securities representatives, as of 2016. Continue reading...

How Does Arbitrage Work and What Is It?

Unlock the secrets of arbitrage, a trading strategy that has intrigued investors for decades. Dive into its mechanisms, explore real-world examples, and discover how savvy traders exploit market discrepancies. Are you ready to navigate the intricate world of arbitrage? Continue reading...

What Is the National Futures Association (NFA)?

The National Futures Association (NFA) is an independent, self-regulatory organization for the U.S. futures and derivatives markets. Designated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) as a registered futures association, the NFA's mandate is to safeguard the integrity of the derivatives markets, protect investors, and ensure that members fulfill their regulatory obligations. The NFA operates at no cost to the taxpayer and is primarily financed by membership dues, fees, and assessments paid by members and other users of the derivatives markets. Continue reading...

How Statistical Arbitrage Can Lead to Big Profits?

Statistical arbitrage is one of the most influential trading strategies ever devised. It thrives on the idea that financial markets are not always perfectly efficient, and there are opportunities to profit from short-term price discrepancies. In this article, we'll delve into the world of statistical arbitrage, exploring its origins, strategies, and the impact it has on financial markets. Continue reading...

What is Mortgage Suitability?

Mortgage suitability is a standard that does not technically exist in a regulatory way at this point, even though some legislators and consumer protection groups have sought such a standard. Some financial services representatives, for instance, operate under a suitability standard that takes the financial situation and goals of the individual into account when making investment recommendations. This protects consumers to the extent that it deters some professionals from taking advantage of the consumer and being possibly subject to fines, sanctions, and suspension or loss of license due to violations of the standard. Continue reading...

What makes arbitrage trading a legal practice?

Unlock the world of financial opportunities through arbitrage trading. Learn why it's legal, how it enhances market efficiency, and why arbitrageurs are vital in maintaining market liquidity. Dive into the world of profitable and legitimate financial strategies. #ArbitrageTrading #FinancialMarkets #MarketEfficiency Continue reading...

What is High-Frequency Trading (HFT) and How Does it Work?

Dive into the enigmatic realm of High-Frequency Trading (HFT), where speed, secrecy, and strategy reign supreme. This guide unveils the mechanics, strategies, and influential role of HFT firms in the financial markets. Discover how these covert powerhouses leverage cutting-edge technology and sophisticated algorithms to shape market dynamics and drive profits. Whether you're a financial enthusiast or a seasoned trader, this exploration of HFT offers valuable insights into the high-speed, high-stakes world of modern trading. Equip yourself with the knowledge to understand and navigate the complexities of HFT in today's rapidly evolving financial landscape. Continue reading...

What is market neutral?

Market neutral is a term used to describe strategies of investing that are poised to benefit whether the market goes up or down, or even if it stays stagnant. Some professionally managed funds might take a market-neutral stance in their entirety, or investors might employ market-neutral strategies for specific parts of their portfolio. Market Neutral means that your position as an investor is neither bearish nor bullish, and you may be able to profit whether the market moves up or down, or even if it doesn’t move at all. Options traders, for instance, have a wide variety of market-neutral positions that they can take, since profiting may depend more on the presence of volatility rather than price movement in one direction or another. Continue reading...

What are the steps involved in using index futures?

Discover the world of Index Futures! These financial instruments offer valuable insights and opportunities for investors. Learn how to calculate fair value, use arbitrage, and predict market direction. Master the art of Index Futures to excel in dynamic financial markets. 📈 #Finance #Investing Continue reading...

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