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What is a covered call?

What is a covered call?

A covered call is when the writer or seller of a call option either owns the underlying security, or has a guaranteed way to obtain it. Investors are able to open a position for another investor to take. An example of this would be selling a call option. The seller, or “writer,” of the contract is obligated to fulfill the contractual obligation outlined in the call, namely to deliver 100 shares of the underlying stock to the owner of the call option in exchange for the strike price listed in the call contract. Continue reading...

What is the Price to Earnings Ratio (P/E Ratio)?

The Price to Earnings ratio is a company’s stock price relative to its net income per share. A low P/E indicates that a stock is trading at a low premium to earnings, which may indicate that the market thinks low relative growth rates are ahead for the company. A company with a high P/E means investors are willing to pay a premium for growth, perhaps anticipating high future growth rates for the company. The P/E ratio is calculated by dividing the market value per share of a company by its earnings per share. Continue reading...

Is there any merit to fundamental analysis of the markets?

Is there any merit to fundamental analysis of the markets?

Fundamental analysis has been around for a long time, and will probably always remain relevant. Fundamental Analysis is the oldest and most well-established market theory. Fundamental analysis is to take all the real-world information about a company into account when evaluating securities and to acknowledge that the shares are what they are: partial ownership in a company. It follows that someone should know about the company and its earnings potential. Continue reading...

Should I Trust an Article Such as “Five Awesome Value Stocks?”

Articles that list “great value” buys should be food for thought, but may not put food on your table. Value stocks are those with low Price to Earnings ratios. To say that a particular Value Stock has an “Awesome” value is to say that it has been significantly undervalued by the market. While sometimes the market is ignorant of the growth potential and strong fundamentals of a particular company, the author of such an article would have you believe there is a great big crystal ball in his office. Continue reading...

What is the Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP)?

In 2009 the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) commissioned the HARP program to help Americans upside-down on mortgages to get approved for mortgage refinancing. This is only available to people whose mortgages are already owned by Freddie Mae and Freddie Mac. Many Americans find themselves upside-down, or underwater, on their home mortgages, particularly after the housing bubble popped in 2008. To be underwater means that there is more owed on the loan than the home can serve as collateral for. Continue reading...

Revolutionizing Fintech: The Potent Potential of Artificial Intelligence

Revolutionizing Fintech: The Potent Potential of Artificial Intelligence

Discover how the fusion of AI and fintech is revolutionizing the financial sector. From enhancing security to improving customer interactions, automating processes, and democratizing access to sophisticated investment tools, the potent potential of AI in fintech is reshaping the future of finance. Dive in to explore the transformative power of AI in fintech! Continue reading...

What is the Profit Rate for the Head-and-Shoulders Bottom (Bullish) Pattern?

What is the Profit Rate for the Head-and-Shoulders Bottom (Bullish) Pattern?

The bullish head and shoulders is the opposite image of a bearish head and shoulders. It has all the same parts—two shoulders, a neckline, and the head. Only instead of the shoulders and head being formed at high points for the stock, they are formed at low points. The investor psychology is the opposite of the bearish pattern. The stock is falling and hits a temporary low to form the left shoulder before a bounce occurs and forms the left side of the neck. The upward momentum is temporary and the next down leg takes the stock lower than the left shoulder and forms the head. Continue reading...

What is the Risk/Return Trade-Off

There are investments which have the potential for very high returns, but they will always be that much riskier than the lower-yielding alternatives, and this is part of the risk/return trade-off. The relationship between risk and return is a positive linear relationship in most theoretical depictions, and if an investor seeks greater returns, he or she will have to take on greater risk. This is called the risk/return trade-off. For more stability and less risk, an investor will have to sacrifice some potential returns. Continue reading...

What is a ratio put spread?

What is a ratio put spread?

A ratio put spread uses multiple put contracts in a certain ratio that makes them start off delta-neutral. Ratio put spreads are similar to regular spreads, but instead of using the same number of put contracts sold short as are held long, ratio spreads are set up with more of one than the other, in a ratio such as 2:1 or 3:2. The short contracts will have different strike prices than the long contracts. Continue reading...

How to use the Broadening Bottom (Bullish) Pattern

How to use the Broadening Bottom (Bullish) Pattern

A broadening bottom can be characterized as a bullish reversal pattern. It consists of two divergent lines that form a triangle. The movements between the two triangle sides increase as the pattern continues. Each side must be touched at least twice to be validated. The Broadening Bottom pattern is formed when the price of a security progressively makes higher highs (2, 4) and lower lows (1, 3, 5) following two widening trend lines. The price is expected to move up or down past the pattern depending on which line is broken first. What distinguishes a Broadening Bottom from a Broadening Top is that the price of the security is declining prior to entering the pattern formation. Continue reading...

What is the Broadening Wedge Descending (Bullish) Pattern?

What is the Broadening Wedge Descending (Bullish) Pattern?

The Broadening Wedge Descending pattern forms when the price of a pair makes lower lows (1, 3, 5) and lower highs (2, 4), forming a downtrend. This pattern may form when large investors spread out their selling over a period of time. When the initial selling occurs, other market participants react to the falling price and jump on the bandwagon to participate. Then the value investors begin to buy, believing the price has fallen too much, which spurs the original large investor to resume buying again as well. Continue reading...

Keywords: potential profit,
What is the Broadening Wedge Ascending (Bullish) Pattern?

What is the Broadening Wedge Ascending (Bullish) Pattern?

The Broadening Wedge Ascending pattern forms when the price of a pair progressively makes higher highs (1, 3) and higher lows (2, 4), following two widening trend lines. This pattern may form when large investors spread their buying over a period of time. The theory goes that after initial buying occurs, other market participants react to the rising price and jump on the bandwagon to participate. Then value investors begin to sell, believing the price has risen too much, which spurs the original large investor to resume buying again. Once these activities stop, the price may break out in either direction. Continue reading...

Keywords: potential profit,

What is the Cup-and-Handle (Bullish) Pattern?

Pattern trading in the security market isn’t new. For years — decades even— traders have been scouring charts on a daily basis in search of pattern formations. The thinking has been that if you found a pattern early in its formation, maybe you could capitalize on a trade by predicting where the security was headed. The Cup-and-Handle pattern is a great example of how this works. Here is an image of the geometric pattern formation: Continue reading...

Keywords: potential profit,
What is a bull put spread?

What is a bull put spread?

A bull put spread is used when an investor thinks the price of a security is set to rise modestly. The strategy involves buying one put option on the security while simultaneously selling another put option at a higher strike price. A Bull Put Spread is usually a vertical spread, meaning the two options used have the same expiration date (and different prices). The lower-strike put option is bought and held long, while the higher-strike option is sold short. The short position sold will be at or just below the current market price for the security, and the long position will be at a lower strike price than the short position. Continue reading...

What is the Head-and-Shoulders Top (Bearish) Pattern?

What is the Head-and-Shoulders Top (Bearish) Pattern?

The Head and Shoulders pattern has five points to it. There is the left shoulder, the left side visit to the neckline area, the head, the right side visit to the neckline, and the right shoulder. A head and shoulders pattern appears as a baseline with three peaks, the outside two are close in height and the middle is highest. The image below is an example of the bearish head and shoulders pattern: Continue reading...

What Can a Blockchain Do?

What Can a Blockchain Do?

Blockchain technology is already being used and developed for many important and impressive applications, and much more is yet to be discovered. Blockchains use distributed work to obtain consensus for changes to a distributed ledger.  Because of their nature, blockchains are incredibly powerful tools that can be used in many realms and applications. They offer security in that they are almost unhackable; any attempted unauthorized changes to the system are immediately obvious to the entire system because it is built on agreement and consensus among its many nodes. Because this structure gives each addition to the ledger, and the record in the ledger, a high degree of integrity and security, future applications of blockchains are being researched in various fields around the world. Continue reading...

What is Book Value?

Book value is based on an accounting method that only considers certain factors, generally the more tangible or easily quantifiable ones, and excludes the more ethereal factors such as ‘goodwill.’ Book value can apply to an individual asset, a security, or a company, and tends to be pretty straightforward. Whatever value an asset is given on a balance sheet is its book value. For a tangible asset, this is calculated as the cost of the asset minus accumulated depreciation. Continue reading...

What does price to tangible book value (PTBV) mean?

What does price to tangible book value (PTBV) mean?

Price to Tangible Book Value serves as a conservative estimation of the value inherent in a share, without Goodwill and other intangibles (opposite of tangibles) factored in. Price to Tangible Book Value (PTBV) is a ratio of the share price over the Tangible Book Value of a company and helps investors see what inherent value is present on a company's books. The Tangible Value does not include goodwill, patents, and other intangible values. Continue reading...

What are Tangible Assets?

Tangible assets are the property of a company that are tangible and can be quickly liquidated. This includes current-period accounts receivable and money in checking, savings, and money-market accounts. Buildings, land, equipment and inventory are all tangible assets as well. Tangible assets are an important part of a company’s book value. For most valuations, intangible assets such as patents, other intellectual property, and goodwill are not included. Continue reading...

Which mid-cap stocks show potential for growth in Q2 2023?

strong financial indicators and strategic developments, make them noteworthy choices for momentum-driven investors. As you navigate the mid-cap stock landscape in Q2 2023, remember to conduct thorough research and consider your investment goals and risk tolerance. Diversification and staying informed are key to success in the ever-changing world of investing. Continue reading...