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What is Capital Structure?

Capital structure gives a framework for a company’s makeup and how it finances its operations, because it includes long and short-term debt plus common and preferred equity. Capital structure is a mix of a company's long-term debt, specific short-term debt, common equity and preferred equity. Often times, investors will want to look at a company’s debt-to-equity ratio as a telltale of what their capital structure is. The higher the debt-to-equity ratio, the more that particular company is borrowing to finance operations versus using cash flow or assets on hand. Continue reading...

What is Burn Rate?

What is Burn Rate?

Burn rate is a term for negative cash flow, or the rate at which a company burns through capital, especially a startup company. Burn rate is used frequently in the world of startups and venture capital. Using a burn rate, investors can see how much longer operations can be sustained with the capital at hand, and this length of time is called a runway. Startups will normally need at least a few months before they start generating enough revenue to have a positive cash flow. Burn rate is normally expressed as the monthly negative cash flow. Continue reading...

Who are venture capitalists?

Who are venture capitalists?

Venture capitalists may have been entrepreneurs themselves who are now helping newer companies achieve success in return for large equity positions in the business. They may also work for investment banks. They form firms which manage a portfolio of venture capital investments. Venture capitalists are firms whose business model is to infuse money into companies which do not have access to the capital markets, or do not want to turn to the open market, in return for equity in the business. Continue reading...

What is a Private Placement?

Investing in a private placement opportunity is done off-exchange, and usually involves a small number of investors who are either institutions or accredited private investors. There are many possibilities when it comes to the types of private placement investments that can be made, but the nature of the offering is that it is not public, it is made to a small number of institutional level or individual accredited investors (see Regulation D, Rule 505 and 506), and the offering is not registered with the SEC. Continue reading...

What kind of venture capital funds exist?

What kind of venture capital funds exist?

Different venture capital firms focus on different types of funding. Some are more attuned to late-stage funding for proven companies who still have not gone public, while others prefer to help startups with bright futures. There are large venture capital firms, which might invest in any start-up company, as long as they think that the company has potential. There are also more narrow VC firms specializing only in one or a small number of industries, such as clean energy, or semiconductors. Continue reading...

What are Bitcoin Mining Pools?

What are Bitcoin Mining Pools?

Individuals who do not have the computing power to compete with large bitcoin mining operations can join a mining pool and split the rewards. Mining pools allow individuals with insufficient computing power to join a mining pool and split the rewards proportionally to the amount of computer power that they contributed. If a user contributes 3% of the computing power that it took for the pool to solve a block, that user will receive 3% of the reward. Continue reading...

What Is a Startup?

What Is a Startup?

In the dynamic world of entrepreneurship and business, the term "startup" has become synonymous with innovation, ambition, and a touch of uncertainty. But what exactly is a startup, and what are the critical elements involved in getting one off the ground? In this article, we'll explore the intricacies of startups, from their definition to the challenges and opportunities they present. Continue reading...

What is Form 1040-X?

What is Form 1040-X?

IRS Link to Form — Found Here Form 1040-X is the amendment form used to change previously submitted information from the 1040, 1040-A, or 1040-EZ tax filing form. The taxpayer has 3 years to file the 1040-X to make changes. The 1040-A and EZ are simpler versions of the 1040 which can be used by individuals who have relatively simple filings to do, and have modest household income. The 1040-X requires a line-by-line amendment request and explanation of why the changes are being requested. You will also need to attach supporting documents that provide more information about the changes being requested. Continue reading...

What is a Unicorn in the World of Startups and Why Does It Matter?

What is a Unicorn in the World of Startups and Why Does It Matter?

In the bustling world of startups, the term "unicorn" stands as a beacon of success, representing companies that have achieved a staggering valuation of over $1 billion. But what truly defines these high-value ventures? Beyond their impressive financial worth, unicorns symbolize innovation, growth, and a touch of rarity in the vast entrepreneurial landscape. From their intriguing origins, introduced by venture capitalist Aileen Lee, to real-world success stories like Nuro and Instacart, the unicorn phenomenon offers a captivating narrative. Whether you view them as a testament to technological advancement or question their long-term sustainability, there's no denying the impact unicorns have on modern business. Dive deeper to uncover the intricacies of these enigmatic entities, their pathways to success, and the debates they spark in the financial realm. Join us as we journey through the ever-evolving dynamics of business and finance, exploring the allure and significance of the unicorn phenomenon. Continue reading...

What Is an Angel Investor?

What Is an Angel Investor?

Angel investors are typically high-net-worth individuals with a keen eye for investment opportunities beyond traditional markets. They seek out promising startups with innovative ideas and invest their own money to help these ventures take flight. However, it's important to note that the ventures they support are inherently risky. In fact, studies suggest that only about 11% of startups backed by angel investors end up succeeding. Despite this, angels continue to play a vital role in the entrepreneurial ecosystem, with their investments averaging around $42,000 per venture. Continue reading...

When Should I Start Saving Money?

The answer is simple and needs only common sense to understand: you should begin saving as soon as you can! However, because of most people’s spending habits and the day-to-day realities of life, it is often difficult to follow that advice. Let’s compare how your savings would accumulate, depending on the age at which you begin to save. Your total savings will be much greater by the time you want to retire – say when you’re 65 – if you invest $5000/year at age 25 for just 10 years, than if you continuously invested $10,000/year at age 35, or $15,000/year at age 45. Continue reading...

Where do I Get Started in Saving for Retirement?

Your employer is usually the best place to start, but you can also open your own retirement account (an IRA or Roth IRA, for instance) at your bank or a major custodian (like Charles Schwab or Fidelity). In some cases, there are income limits for contributing to a retirement account, which a financial advisor can discuss with you. A smart idea is to set up an automatic contribution to your retirement account, such as 10% of your monthly income. That way you’re automatically saving, and saving regularly. Continue reading...

What is Publication 17 for Individual Federal Income Taxes?

IRS Link to Publication — Found Here The Publication 17 is a very large and detailed guide to help individuals correctly file their federal income tax returns. Form 1040, 1040-A, and 1040-EZ are the return forms used by individuals for federal income tax, but most people won’t know which one to use without either consulting a tax professional or reading this handy 290-some-odd page document. There are many ins-and-outs when it comes to filing federal income tax returns, and Publication 17 is robust enough to clear up many of the questions that might be asked by non-professional filers and CPAs alike. Issues such as filing status, charitable contributions, and a list of instructions for deductions individuals can take, are all listed, among other things. Continue reading...

What is the Best Age to Start Receiving Social Security Benefits?

What is the Best Age to Start Receiving Social Security Benefits?

Generally speaking, the closer you are to age 70, the better. But everyone will need to take all of their options into account and use some planning tools or the assistance of a professional planner to arrive at an ideal cash flow scenario for retirement. All assets should be brought into consideration, as well as the possible social security benefits of both spouses and their spousal benefits. There is no one “best age” to start receiving the Social Security benefits. Everyone has a Normal Retirement Age (NRA), which determines the age at which you can receive your “full” Social Security benefits, but you can defer your benefits past this point to receive an 8% increase for every additional year you deferred your benefit. Note that benefits cannot be deferred past age 70. Continue reading...

How Do I Start Trading Binary Options in the U.S.?

Binary options are financial instruments that offer a straightforward and binary choice for traders – a simple yes or no proposition. This unique characteristic has made binary options an attractive choice for traders, both experienced and newcomers to the financial markets. In this article, we will explore the world of binary options, how they function, the pros and cons, and where you can legally trade them in the United States. Binary options are named as such because they offer just two possible outcomes: a fixed amount or nothing at all, based on whether the trader's prediction is correct. Continue reading...

How to Start, Manage, and Thrive in an Investor Club: A Comprehensive Guide

How to Start, Manage, and Thrive in an Investor Club: A Comprehensive Guide

Tickeron’s Investor Clubs are a great opportunity to be a part of a community and interact with fellow investors, as well as exchange ideas and compare your skills. These clubs also help create an audience if you want to monetize your skills in the future. To access, from the menu bar, simply click the Trading tab, then click on Investor Clubs. To create an investor club you have to have a starting portfolio and ideas on how you would re-allocate it. You do not need to create a club -- you can just follow as many as you like. As soon as you join a club, you can have private discussions with club members. Continue reading...

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Getting Started with Options Trading: What Are the Key Considerations for Warrants?

It’s a pervasive myth about options that they are complicated and risky. The reality, however, is that options are nothing more than a vehicle to gain exposure to stocks in different ways. You see, it’s very easy to categorize options as difficult to understand, but knowing just a few basic characteristics about options makes them very useful and easy to understand. Anyone—meaning absolutely anyone—can learn how to confidently trade options. In fact, there are plenty of books on how to become an options trader. Continue reading...

How Much Money Will I Need to Get Started Investing?

How Much Money Will I Need to Get Started Investing?

First things first, accumulate six months’ of cash as emergency savings. Then you can start investing. From there, it makes sense to try and set up a monthly investment plan, where you set aside a certain amount of money each month and stick to that schedule. If there is any extra money in any given month, put that away too. Once you build up a few thousand dollars, you can start buying broad-based ETFs or mutual funds to gain diversification while also getting equity exposure for growth. Continue reading...

What are the Tax Implications of Owning Bonds?

What are the Tax Implications of Owning Bonds?

Some bonds receive preferential tax treatment. The interest you receive is fully taxable, unless the bonds are issued by municipalities, states, federal governments, or corporations with special tax-exempt statuses (such as school districts, infrastructure facilities, hospitals, and so on). The first very general rule of thumb – if you reside in a certain municipality and buy bonds of that municipality, the interest is not taxable. Continue reading...

What was the “Dot Com” Bubble?

The late 1990’s saw a huge uptick in the number of tech startups, as the age of the Internet took hold and new companies scrambled for a share of the action. As more and more people began to access the world (wide web) of information, new technology companies became more and more abundant in an effort to tap the commercial potential of having a global customer base. This led to excessive valuations of companies that didn't even yet have earnings, as investors poured money in hoping for the "next big thing." Continue reading...