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What is an Expense Ratio?

Generally associated with mutual funds and exchange traded funds, the expense ratio represents the total annual management fee. The expense ratio is the annual management fee charged to shareholders by ETFs and mutual funds. The annual fee typically comprises the annual management fee, 12b-1 fees (which are associated with research costs), operating costs, and all other administrative type fees that go into the product. The expense ratio encompasses all of these fees as one percentage. Continue reading...

What are No-Load Mutual Funds?

Mutual funds that do not charge a front-end or back-end sales load are known as no-load funds. What are Load Mutual Funds? While no-load mutual funds do not require the investor to pay sales charges (i.e., commissions) when buying or selling that fund, it’s important to remember that nothing is free, especially in the world of financial services. The portfolio manager of the fund and his team of analysts still have their salaries, bonuses, retirement benefits, and so on, and fees are needed to pay for it. Continue reading...

What are Load Mutual Funds?

“Load” mutual funds are those which have a fee structure that includes a front-end or back-end sales charge. All funds have expenses, but not all funds have loads. Loads are sales charges that are part of the fee structure of a mutual fund. Each mutual fund will typically offer a few types of shares classes to its investors, and the main difference between the share classes are their fee structures. There are front-end loads, which come out of your initial investment and can be up to 5%. Continue reading...

What does correlation mean?

Financial traders use correlation to describe the movement of securities – how and when they move – relative to each other during a given time period. These relationships lend themselves well to pairs trading, where traders have developed an understanding of correlations and their behavior that allow them to confidently exploit slight changes to minimize risk and maximize profitable transactions. Continue reading...

What are Bank Deposits?

Deposits are cash, checks, and electronic transfers that banking customers put into their personal or corporate bank accounts. Deposits will increase the balance, or pay off a debt, within a bank account. Deposits may not show up on an account balance until they have cleared from the institution or account from which the check is written or the electronic transfer was requested. The types of accounts that can receive bank deposits include but are not limited to checking, savings, and money market accounts. Bank Certificates of Deposit (CDs) can be purchased with an initial deposit that satisfied minimum amount. Deposits are considered liabilities on the balance sheet of the bank, since they are obligated to pay that money out when a customer requests it. Continue reading...

What is a Partnership?

A partnership is a business owned by two or more people, usually designated as an LLC. They play a role in the operation of the business, and are responsible for the legal and financial liabilities. In a partnership, as in a sole proprietorship, there is no legal shield against law suits and liabilities unless they have filed as an LLC or S-Corp. If the partnership were to be sued, without any kind of legal shield in place, the owners would be held completely accountable. Continue reading...

What is Chapter 12?

Chapter 12 is a category of bankruptcy filing that can be made by a family farmer. It is otherwise similar in structure to Chapter 13 bankruptcy, where the debtor can prove an income and a trustee serves as intermediary between the debtor and the creditors. A family farmer will still be permitted to operate the farm once he has filed Chapter 12 bankruptcy. Like a Chapter 13 filing, the debtor will be allowed to propose a debt repayment schedule that he or she believes would be successful over the following 3-5 years. Some assets would be liquidated to pay off debts, but most of it would be paid according to the repayment schedule, under the care of a trustee who would serve as the proxy for the debtor in the remainder of the dealings with the creditors. Continue reading...

What is Tier 1 Capital?

Tier 1 Capital are the core asset holdings of a bank. They are disclosed, liquid, risk-averse assets, and are used by regulators to evaluate a bank's compliance with capital requirements. Banks lend out about as much money as they can in general. They must have capital on hand to absorb losses and remain solvent. The Basel Accord is an international agreement dealing with capital reserve requirements for banks, enacted after the meltdown of 2008. Continue reading...

What is Business-to-Business (B2B)?

Explore the world of Business-to-Business (B2B) with this comprehensive guide. From traditional interactions to e-commerce evolution, uncover how B2B drives industries like automotive, property management, and more. Discover the contrasts between B2C and the future of inter-business transactions. A must-read for business professionals! Continue reading...

Bitcoin’s Source Code, Pt 1: What Does Open-Source Mean?

Many examples of open-source software exist today, including the code for Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. “Open-source” describes software or code that is available for anyone to use, modify, study, or share without incurring any cost. In most cases, the open-source software has been created through unrestricted and collaborative community involvement, which is sometimes called “crowd-sourced.” The word “source” in this case refers to the source code that lays the foundation for software programs. In some cases, the same source code can be used as the foundation for many different software applications built on top of it. For example, the Valve Corporation’s game engine code, ironically named Source, has been used to create approximately 50 different games, many of them by independent developers using the open-source code. Continue reading...

Weekly Review: Financial Market Leaders from July 1 to July 5

During the week of July 1 to July 5, financial markets experienced a dynamic range of performances. Base metals saw an uptick, while natural gas prices dropped sharply. Major indexes and cryptocurrencies showed significant movements, reflecting broader market trends and investor sentiments. Notable gains in sectors such as technology and commodities contrasted with declines in healthcare and industrials, providing a comprehensive overview of the week's economic landscape. Continue reading...

What Is Electronic Commerce (E-commerce)?

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How Does Compound Interest Work? Calculations and Examples Explained

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Week (July 8 - 12) in Review: Financial Leaders

The week of July 8 to July 12 saw dynamic market movements with cryptocurrencies experiencing substantial gains and inverse ETFs facing significant declines. Financial, real estate, and industrial sectors showed strong performances, while the communications sector lagged. This diverse market activity highlights the varying economic influences and investor sentiments driving current market behavior. Continue reading...

What Is a Tax Bracket?

A tax bracket refers to a range of incomes subject to a certain income tax rate. Tax brackets are part of a progressive tax system, in which the level of tax rates progressively increases as an individual’s income grows. Low incomes fall into tax brackets with relatively low income tax rates, while higher earnings fall into brackets with higher rates. For tax years 2022 and 2023, there are seven federal tax brackets, with rates ranging from 10% to 37%. In this article, we will explore the intricacies of tax brackets, provide examples, and discuss the pros and cons of this tax system. Continue reading...

4 Tips for Fast, Effective Stock Analysis

Enhance your stock analysis process with these four crucial tips. Learn to identify trends, utilize AI tools, and make informed investment decisions swiftly and effectively Continue reading...

What are the Top 10 Largest Companies Globally?

When it comes to the global business landscape, size often matters. The largest companies in the world not only wield immense economic influence but also play a crucial role in shaping our everyday lives. In this article, we will take a closer look at the top 10 largest companies globally, as of January 2023, ranked by their 12-month trailing revenue. Continue reading...

Which mid-cap stocks show potential for growth in Q2 2023?

strong financial indicators and strategic developments, make them noteworthy choices for momentum-driven investors. As you navigate the mid-cap stock landscape in Q2 2023, remember to conduct thorough research and consider your investment goals and risk tolerance. Diversification and staying informed are key to success in the ever-changing world of investing. Continue reading...

What is an Accelerative Endowment?

Cash-value life policies can be structured for certain endowment ages, and dividends from the company can accelerate the endowment age. Traditional life insurance policies, especially older ones always had an “endowment age,” which meant that if the insured reached that age, their death benefit would be paid out in one lump sum, to be used however the insured wanted. The endowment age used to be about 95 or 100 years old, but in the last few years most companies have moved the age of endowment back to about age 120, since people are living longer and longer, and it looked like they were going to be paying out too many contracts at endowment age instead of at time of death in the future. Continue reading...

Which Silver Miner ETFs Were Top Performers in Q3 2021?

The silver market has been on a remarkable journey over the past year, outperforming the broader stock market indices. As of June 1, 2021, the Bloomberg Silver Subindex showed a staggering 45.4% increase in silver prices over the previous 12 months, surpassing the S&P 500's total return of 39.7%. This bullish trend in silver has piqued the interest of many investors looking to capitalize on the precious metal's momentum. If you're considering entering the silver market, exchange-traded funds (ETFs) focused on silver miners might be an attractive option. In this article, we will explore three silver miner ETFs to watch for in Q3 2021. Continue reading...