MENU
Popular articles
Table of Contents

EDU Articles

Ad is loading...

Popular articles
Table of Contents
Help CenterFind Your WayBuy/Sell Daily ProductsIntraday ProductsFAQ
Expert's OpinionsBest StocksInvestingTradingCryptoArtificial Intelligence
IntroductionMarket AbbreviationsStock Market StatisticsThinking about Your Financial FutureSearch for AdvisorsFinancial CalculatorsFinancial MediaFederal Agencies and Programs
Investment PortfoliosModern Portfolio TheoriesInvestment StrategyPractical Portfolio Management InfoDiversificationRatingsActivities AbroadTrading Markets
Investment Terminology and InstrumentsBasicsInvestment TerminologyTrading 1 on 1BondsMutual FundsExchange Traded Funds (ETF)StocksAnnuities
Technical Analysis and TradingAnalysis BasicsTechnical IndicatorsTrading ModelsPatternsTrading OptionsTrading ForexTrading CommoditiesSpeculative Investments
Cryptocurrencies and BlockchainBlockchainBitcoinEthereumLitecoinRippleTaxes and Regulation
RetirementSocial Security BenefitsLong-Term Care InsuranceGeneral Retirement InfoHealth InsuranceMedicare and MedicaidLife InsuranceWills and Trusts
Retirement Accounts401(k) and 403(b) PlansIndividual Retirement Accounts (IRA)SEP and SIMPLE IRAsKeogh PlansMoney Purchase/Profit Sharing PlansSelf-Employed 401(k)s and 457sPension Plan RulesCash-Balance PlansThrift Savings Plans and 529 Plans and ESA
Personal FinancePersonal BankingPersonal DebtHome RelatedTax FormsSmall BusinessIncomeInvestmentsIRS Rules and PublicationsPersonal LifeMortgage
Corporate BasicsBasicsCorporate StructureCorporate FundamentalsCorporate DebtRisksEconomicsCorporate AccountingDividendsEarnings
What is market equilibrium?

What is market equilibrium?

Market Equilibrium occurs when fluctuations between supply and demand balance out, keeping prices relatively stable. This trend appears relatively horizontal or sideways when charted. Both price equilibrium and quantity equilibrium should meet at the same point where the supply and demand curves meet on a chart. According to the Law of Supply, with all factors being equal, if the price of a good or service increases, the supply of that good or service will increase. If demand doesn't meet it, the price of that good or service must come down; this increases demand but might cause a shortage in supply, which might drive prices back up, and so on. Continue reading...

What is market disequilibrium?

What is market disequilibrium?

Market Disequilibrium occurs when market and external forces combine to unbalance a market, creating inefficiency in the market in the process. A disequilibrium produces what’s called a “deadweight loss,” “welfare loss,” “excess burden,” or “allocative inefficiency.” As described by efficient market theory, the price fluctuations we see in market behavior are the market trying to find its truly efficient price and quantity – the theoretical point of equilibrium. Investors attempt to locate it using moving averages and other means of technical analysis. Continue reading...

What is the Law of Supply?

All other things being equal, if the price of a good increases, the supply of that good will increase, and this is known as the Law of Supply. The Supply Curve is plotted on a graph with a y-axis being price and an x-axis being quantity. The relationship is positive and the line will climb up to the right. The is the opposite direction of the Demand Curve, and the place where the two intersect is considered to be the point of market equilibrium. The curves can be shifted by variables not present on the graph, such as changes in levels of income and other factors, but the slopes will remain the same, theoretically. Continue reading...

What is the random walk hypothesis?

What is the random walk hypothesis?

The Random Walk Hypothesis states that in an efficient market, prices will correlate around the intrinsic value of securities, but there will always be a randomization and unpredictability to it. The Random Walk Hypothesis suggests that technical analysis and the efforts of chartists cannot beat the market over time, because the market will move randomly and unpredictably, and past results cannot predict future returns. Continue reading...

What Is Nash Equilibrium?

Nash equilibrium, a critical concept in game theory, signifies the optimal outcome when no player has an incentive to change their strategy, knowing their opponents’ strategies. It's where an individual's action, given the actions of others, leads to the best possible result for all involved. However, it doesn't guarantee the best individual payoff in every situation. Continue reading...

What Is Microeconomics?

What Is Microeconomics?

Microeconomics, often referred to as the study of the "small picture" in economics, is a branch of the discipline that delves into the nitty-gritty of individual and firm behavior in the market. This field is instrumental in deciphering the intricate web of choices, decisions, and incentives that guide our resource allocation, production, exchange, and consumption. At its core, microeconomics seeks to illuminate the consequences of decisions made by individuals and firms in response to changes in various factors, including incentives, prices, resources, and production methods. Continue reading...

Why Does the Price of a Stock Change?

Stock prices change based on the law of supply and demand. Ultimately, as with the price of any good or service, the outstanding supply and consumer demand will define its value in the marketplace. Indeed, the efficient market hypothesis states that the price of a LINK will already reflect all known information about it and what investors are willing to pay for it at the time, based on that information. Continue reading...

What is market efficiency?

What is market efficiency?

Market efficiency describes the degree to which relevant information is integrated into the price of a security. With the prevalence of information technology today, markets are considered highly efficient; most investors have access to the same information with prices and industry news, updated instantaneously. The Efficient Market Hypothesis stems from this idea. Efficient markets are said to have all relevant information priced-in to the securities almost immediately. High trading volume also makes a market more efficient, as there is a high degree of liquidity for buyers and sellers, and the spread between bid and ask prices narrows. Continue reading...

What is naked shorting?

What is naked shorting?

In a regular short sale transaction, the seller would locate and borrow the security being sold before the sale. Naked shorting means that the seller has not located or secured the security being short sold, and is in many cases illegal. Naked shorting is illegal because it accompanies an extreme likelihood that the security sold short will be FTD (Fail to Deliver) within the settlement period. Naked shorting is selling something that you do not have, without confirming that you can get the security to deliver, or even that the security exists. Naked short selling has a long history. Continue reading...

What is a Market Maker?

What is a Market Maker?

A market maker is a broker-dealer firm or a registered individual that will hold a certain number of shares of a security in order to facilitate trading. There could be as many as 50 market makers for one particular security, and they compete for customer order flows by displaying buy and sell quotations for a guaranteed number of shares. The market maker spread refers to the difference between the amount a market maker is willing to pay for a security and the amount that the other party is willing to sell it. Continue reading...

What is a Quote?

Quotes are current pricing information about individual securities on an exchange. A potential investor will refer to a current quote to see what price a security traded at most recently. A quote will also show the bid and ask prices, which indicates the price other buyers are attempting to buy the security for (bid), and the price sellers are trying to sell it for (ask). If you are selling, you're going to get the bid price, and if you're buying, you're going to pay the ask price. The difference between the two is called the spread, and will basically be pocketed by the broker or specialist that handles the transaction. A security with a spread of zero indicates high liquidity and is referred to as a frictionless asset or trade. Continue reading...

What Is Purchasing Power Parity (PPP)?

Purchasing power parity (PPP) is a fundamental concept in macroeconomics that allows analysts to compare economic productivity and standards of living across different countries. At its core, PPP seeks to equalize the value of a common basket of goods in various currencies, thus enabling a meaningful comparison between nations. In this article, we delve into the intricacies of PPP, how it's calculated, and its real-world applications. Continue reading...

What Is the Rectangle Pattern?

The rectangle pattern is a classical technical analysis formation characterized by horizontal lines representing significant support and resistance levels. This pattern illustrates a market in a state of indecision, as prices oscillate between these well-defined boundaries. The rectangle pattern ends when a breakout occurs, signifying a decisive move beyond these levels. Traders have two primary approaches when dealing with rectangles: trading within the pattern by buying near support and selling or shorting near resistance, or waiting for a breakout to occur. Continue reading...

What Is Economics?

What Is Economics?

Economics is a branch of social science that plays a pivotal role in understanding how societies allocate their resources to meet their diverse needs and desires. This complex field encompasses a wide range of topics, from individual decision-making to global economic systems. Let's delve into the world of economics by exploring its various dimensions, types, indicators, and systems. At its core, economics revolves around the study of how societies, organizations, and individuals manage limited resources to fulfill their unlimited wants and needs. It addresses the allocation of resources for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. Continue reading...

Are the markets efficient?

Are the markets efficient?

The concept of an efficient market is more applicable today than it was when it was conceived, a truly efficient market is nearly impossible. The Efficient Market Hypothesis states that random new information will affect the value of securities, and that new information disseminates so quickly among rational investors that it is futile to try to beat the “market portfolio.” Thirty years ago, this was more of a theory than an observable phenomenon, and plenty of inefficiencies in the dissemination of information and the pricing of securities could be pointed out. Continue reading...

What does the term "surplus" mean, and what are its implications, reasons, and outcomes?

What does the term "surplus" mean, and what are its implications, reasons, and outcomes?

Unlock the Secrets of Surplus in Finance & Economics 📈 – Learn why it matters, what causes it, & its impact on markets & governments. Surplus vs. Deficit explained. Discover more now!" #Finance #Economics #SurplusVsDeficit Continue reading...

Is the 50/30/20 Budget Rule the Key to Financial Success?

Is the 50/30/20 Budget Rule the Key to Financial Success?

The 50/30/20 budget rule, championed by Senator Elizabeth Warren, has gained popularity as a straightforward and effective approach to managing personal finances. This rule offers a clear blueprint for budgeting, helping individuals allocate their after-tax income into three distinct categories: needs, wants, and savings. But does this budgeting strategy hold the key to financial success? Let's explore the 50/30/20 rule in detail and its potential benefits. Continue reading...

Why is Maintaining a Diary for All Forex Trades Crucial for Traders

In the world of Forex trading, success is often attributed to one's ability to reflect on past actions and implement learned lessons into future strategies. Keeping a trading diary, which goes beyond the broker-provided records, can significantly bolster your ability to navigate the markets effectively. Here's why maintaining a personal record of your trades is essential. Continue reading...

Is my portfolio diversified enough?

Is my portfolio diversified enough?

Diversification is intended to reduce the volatility of price movements in individual securities, but many people are not sure what proper diversification looks like. It depends. You should definitely have exposure to at least two asset classes: equities and bonds. Within each asset class, diversification is also important. In your equity portfolio, you should have exposure to stocks with various capitalizations (such as Large Cap, Mid Cap, and Small Cap), various geographical areas (such as the Europe), Developing Markets, and Emerging Markets. Continue reading...

What is Federal Reserve Credit?

The Federal Reserve extends credit in the form of short-term loans to member banks. Banks avoid taking loans from the Fed if they can, because it is viewed as a sign of instability. The Federal Discount Rate applies to loans taken from what is known as the discount window at the Fed, and it tends to be a higher rate than what is charged between two banks. The Federal Reserve will extend credit only to banking institutions that are members of the Federal Reserve system. Continue reading...