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Introduction
Investment Portfolios
Investment Terminology and Instruments
Technical Analysis and Trading
Cryptocurrencies and Blockchain
Retirement
Retirement Accounts
Personal Finance
Corporate Basics
What is a ratio put spread?

What is a ratio put spread?

A ratio put spread uses multiple put contracts in a certain ratio that makes them start off delta-neutral. Ratio put spreads are similar to regular spreads, but instead of using the same number of put contracts sold short as are held long, ratio spreads are set up with more of one than the other, in a ratio such as 2:1 or 3:2. The short contracts will have different strike prices than the long contracts. Continue reading...

What is a bear put spread?

What is a bear put spread?

A bear put spread involves the use of two puts, one sold and one bought, at different strike prices, with the intention of profiting from declines in the underlying stock. A Bear Put Spread uses two put contracts, one long and one short, in such a way to achieve a maximum profit from modest downward movements in the underlying stock. A long put is purchased a strike price nearer the money that the short put contract. Continue reading...

How Much will Life Insurance Cost Me?

How Much will Life Insurance Cost Me?

Various kinds of life insurance have various-size premium obligations. Term policies have the lowest premiums, which has to do with the lower probability that a company will have to pay a death claim during that term. Other policies may have cash value that begs the question of how “cost” is defined, if there is a rate of return. Life Insurance premium sizes and costs will depend on the type of policy and the underwriting decisions of the company for each person. The amount you will need to pay depends on a number of factors: type of insurance, your age, your health, and the amount of your death benefit. Continue reading...

What does price to tangible book value (PTBV) mean?

What does price to tangible book value (PTBV) mean?

Price to Tangible Book Value serves as a conservative estimation of the value inherent in a share, without Goodwill and other intangibles (opposite of tangibles) factored in. Price to Tangible Book Value (PTBV) is a ratio of the share price over the Tangible Book Value of a company and helps investors see what inherent value is present on a company's books. The Tangible Value does not include goodwill, patents, and other intangible values. Continue reading...

What is Margin?

The act of “going on margin” means borrowing money from the custodian of your account, in order to purchase additional securities. Another way of saying this is that you are “leveraging” your account. Investors who go on margin are trying to pump up gains in their account, but doing so means taking the risk of outsized losses if you are wrong. To take an account on margin is not free - the custodian will charge interest for the loan, and will essentially use the assets in your account as collateral. Continue reading...

What is a strangle?

What is a strangle?

A strangle is an options strategy which is profitable if the price of the underlying security swings either up or down because the investor has purchased a call and a put just out of the money on either side of the current price of the underlying. To execute a strangle an investor chooses an underlying security which he or she anticipates will experience some price volatility around a given expiration date for options, but is not sure which way it will go, so a call and a put are both purchased. Continue reading...

What is Mortgage Refinancing?

Refinancing a mortgage means to get a new mortgage agreement with a different interest rate. If the prevailing interest rate environment has changed, or if a person’s credit history has strengthened since signing the original mortgage agreement, a homeowner might benefit from refinancing their mortgage with a new arrangement. The bank or lending institution would effectively pay off the first mortgage with the new one, and give the client a different interest rate or mortgage term (length) or monthly payment amount. Continue reading...

What is Tokenization?

What is Tokenization?

Tokenization is a concept that can take several forms, but essentially it means to create a tradeable item which holds value anchored in an asset which is not itself readily tradeable. If something of value is not easily traded, it is natural that a token is created which represents part or all of such value, which can then be held until redemption or circulated as currency. Historically, some things, such as hours of labor, could not easily be accounted for without a physical token. Continue reading...

How to use Andrew's Pitchfork in trading

How to use Andrew's Pitchfork in trading

Alan Andrews designed Andrew’s Pitchfork to define a trend with support and resistance lines around a median line, all three of which are derived from three points at peaks and troughs around the onset of a current trend. The overlay takes the shape of a trident or pitchfork, with Andrews calling the lines “tines,” after a pitchfork’s prongs. The origin point is placed at the location of a major trend reversal or a definitive support/resistance level, forming beginning of the pitchfork’s “handle.” Once the incline of the pitchfork is suitable, traders can attempt to use it for indications of overbought/oversold conditions, or to indicate a transition to a new trend. Continue reading...

How to use Open Interest in trading

How to use Open Interest in trading

Open interest, or OI, can be a very important number for futures, options, and other derivative markets, but it can also be important to traders in the traditional stock market. Open interest in derivatives of stocks indicates that there is a deep market for the stock itself, since many of the positions may eventually require the purchase of the stock. Increases and decreases in open interest may help a trader understand if there's significant action in a security's price movements, which can determine liquidity needs as well as whether the price movements are rooted in actual supply and demand characteristics. Continue reading...